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Torrey Pines High School Cross Country

Like & Share:Nutrition Tips

 

9.24.17/ Peanut Butter Banana Oatmeal Breakfast Bars:

 

INGREDIENTS

 

  • 3 bananas
  • ¼ cup maple or agave syrup ( I use raw honey only)
  • ¼ cup smooth peanut butter
  • ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • ½ cup desiccated unsweetened coconut
  • 1 ½ cups rolled oats 
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 scoop Sunwarrior protein powder vanilla or chocolate

 

DIRECTIONS

 

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees
  2. In a medium sized bowl, mash your bananas until resembling baby food
  3. Mix in your syrup, peanut butter, almond milk, and vanilla until smooth
  4. Finally, mix in the chia, coconut, oats, cinnamon, and baking powder
  5. Mix all ingredients well
  6. Spray a 9x9 baking pan spray with non-stick cooking spray, then dump the banana oat mixture into the pan
  7. Bake for 20–22 minutes until just firm to the touch
  8. Let cool completely before cutting
  9. Store in the fridge in an air tight container until ready to eat!

 

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com

 

Fernanda Aguiar:
Introducing Fernanda Aguiar, AKA Izzy's mom:  She is a Registered Dietician, Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, and Wellness Coach.  Because she races year round as a Silver All World Athlete in the sport of triathlon (IM 70.3 and 140.6), she knows what she is talking about!  Plus, she is an ACE certified Personal Trainer, Nike SPARQ Speed and Agility coach, HKC Kettlebell Certified and Primal Move coach.
Maintaining a strong and healthy athletic performance is more than just a matter of training and keeping in shape.  Your body needs support in the form of proper nutrition, hydration and rest to allow you to keep performing and responding at peak levels.
She will be writing a tip each week.  If you have any questions for her, you may contact her at fe71@mac.com.  (No charge for team athletes).


9.17.17/ Athletic Amenorrhea:

“Athletic Amenorrhea,” is disturbed menstruation due to the demands of high intensity training on the body.


Causes:

1-ESTROGEN

Estrogen reaches its peak level just before ovulation, the releasing of the egg from one of the ovaries. Estrogen is the key to fertility. If your body cannot reach peak levels of estrogen, it cannot release an egg, it cannot ovulate and you will not have a period because there is no egg in the uterus for it to shed.

So, how do we make sure that our bodies reach this peak level of estrogen?
Athletic women who suffer from amenorrhea and are unable to ovulate usually suffer from vitamin deficiency, lower intake of antioxidants, and  a lower BMI.

You need to make sure you are getting iron and various vitamins from food and if necessary from supplements, and also getting enough fat and protein from the diet.

To boost your estrogen levels, eat foods rich in Zinc, (such as nuts, seeds and fish) and Vitamin B6, (found in peppers, eggs, chicken and brown rice); and add a magnesium supplement to your daily multi-vitamin.


Estrogen levels can also be heavily influenced by factors such as sleep and stress.  Making sure that you are sleeping and recovering from workouts well will be beneficial to your fertility and training.

2- NUTRITION

Undereating and lots of miles running and exercising can certainly be factors. Many women runners may not even realize that they are not eating enough.
Your body burns roughly 100 calories each mile that you run and about 1,600 calories just from breathing, walking around and staying awake during the day. Let’s do the math. Lets say that today you ran 10 miles (roughly 1,000 calories) and did one hour of core work (another 1,000 calories) and then just rested on the couch for the rest of the day (1,600 calories). This means that you need to ingest 3,600 calories just to break even.

It ‘s hard to get a grasp on what 3,600 calories looks like.  If you think you may not be eating enough, start keeping a food journal.

PROTEIN:
When you undereat, your body burns protein for energy. Some of the protein comes from your diet; for example, the protein in your omelet gets used for fuel instead of building and repairing muscle.  Some of the protein comes from your muscles, so you experience muscle wasting and that can lead to weaker bones and stress fractures. A 120-pound athlete should target 60 to 90 g protein per day.

VITAMIN D:
Vitamin D is extremely important for bone strength and development. The risk of broken bones and osteoporosis decreases as the level of vitamin D in your blood rises. This nutrient is also one of the fat-soluble vitamins (in addition to vitamins A, E and K). This means that the body requires fat to dissolve and absorb the vitamin in the bloodstream. This is why it is important when you eat foods rich in fat-soluble vitamins that you always intake some source of fat (nuts, avocado, avocado oil, olive oil, ) or foods that contain fat anyway like salmon.
Vitamin D also boost the immune system and improves the absorption of calcium.

CALCIUM:
Calcium is important for the growth and maintenance of strong bones and teeth, and it has a role in muscle contraction and nerve transmission. Insufficient dietary calcium can contribute to stress fractures in the short term and osteoporosis or thinning of the bones later in life, especially in females.


By reaching a good peak bone mass in your twenties you can help reduce your risk. After peak bone mass has been achieved, it is important to try to maintain bone mass.


Calcium foods:
1-Kale cooked
2-Sardines

3-Kefir or yogurt
4-Broccoli
5-Almond milk

MAGNESIUM:
Magnesium deficiency causes noticeable negative symptoms, including muscle aches or spasms, poor digestion, anxiety and trouble sleeping. Yet, magnesium deficiency is often overlooked and rarely tested. Therefore, magnesium may be one of the most underutilized but most necessary supplements there is.


Magnesium may not be the most present mineral in our body in terms of its quantity, but it’s certainly one of the most crucial to overall health. It’s actually involved in over 300 biochemical functions in the body, such as regulating heartbeat rhythms and helping neurotransmitter functions.  Magnesium is needed for proper bone formation and influences the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts that build healthy bone density.

Magnesium is a very important mineral to take in combination with zinc and calcium for better absorption.

Best sources of magnesium:
1-Spinach
2-Swiss Chard
3-Black beans
4-Almonds
5-Pumpkin seeds
6-Avocado
7-Banana
8-Broccoli

 

9.10.17/ Magnesium:
Your body needs magnesium for more than 300 biochemical reactions, and particularly important to runners is magnesium’s effect on muscle function. The mineral affects processes such as electrolyte balance, oxygen uptake and energy production, which are all involved in muscle function.

Magnesium is not produced by the body, so it needs to be ingested daily through the consumption of magnesium-rich foods. 

Performance: Magnesium is vital for the conversion of glycogen to glucose, the body’s main fuel during exercise. Without sufficient levels, the body switches to anaerobic metabolism, resulting in a buildup of lactic acid and associated muscle soreness and spasms. This means if you are low in magnesium you are likely to feel tired and lack energy.
Magnesium also influences protein metabolism, making it important for strength and power as well as recovery.  Even small shortfalls in magnesium intake can seriously impair athletic performance.
 
Bone Health: While calcium is important, it does nothing without adequate levels of magnesium and vitamin D. Magnesium activates cellular enzyme activity, allowing the body to convert vitamin D into its active form to help with calcium absorption and bone building.
 
Recovery: Magnesium, together with calcium, is essential for optimal muscle function. A deficiency in magnesium can result in muscle and nerve twitches, spasms and cramping. Heavy exercisers often experience a buildup of lactic acid, shin splints and painful muscles during and after exercise. Having sufficient magnesium helps speed up recovery, reduce fatigue and avoid injuries.
 
Foods that contain magnesium:
Spinach
Pumpkin seeds 
Chard
Almonds
Black beans
Avocados 
Yogurt 
 
Magnesium Rich Green Smoothie
3 bananas (fresh or frozen)
1/2 bunch of fresh kale
1/2 bunch of fresh spinach
1 Tablespoon of Chlorella
4 dates
2 cups of fresh coconut water
Serves 2. 

 

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com

 

8.27.17/ Hydration:

Hydration:

As soon as an athlete’s body temperature begins to rise, the body will begin to produce sweat, which leads to an aggregate loss in water from the body. Athletes also lose water through respiration during exercise. When the body begins to lose that much water, the excreted water comes in part from the body’s plasma volume, which decreases total circulating blood volume. With a lower plasma volume, the blood’s viscosity increases, and the heart’s stroke volume decreases, causing the heart to work harder.

As the body becomes increasingly dehydrated, the ability for an athlete to perform at the highest level is affected. Aerobic  performance is affected because when the athlete’s heart is required to pump a decreased blood volume to all muscles and organs that demand it, the athlete fatigues more easily and is not able to sustain the same endurance throughout.

The best way to prevent dehydration (from allowing you to perform at your best) is understanding how to avoid and identify dehydration. The simplest way to recognize your hydration level is to check the color of your urine. If it’s pale yellow, you are likely well hydrated. If not, drink more water, but don’t chug, as that could cause your body to excrete the water too quickly. Prior to a performance, you should sip water in the days leading up to a race or long run, as well you should maintain a healthy diet. Any fruits or vegetables will give you additional fluids, and then foods that have higher sodium and potassium will take the place of electrolytes to maintain balance. Eat a normal amount of salt; don’t avoid it or overdo it. Adding plain electrolytes to water is a great option too like Nuun electrolytes (no sugar). 

 

Post running (race) hydration: 

Post-performance hydration is just as important as pre-performance hydration. In terms of the normal body water loss that occurs over the course of regular exercise, you should rehydrate with water or a sports drink with electrolytes (no sugar). I don't recommend Gatorade or any sugary sports drinks.  Coconut water plain is a great option. Nuun or Enduropacks plain electrolytes to add to water.

If you need more information on how much to drink, you can send me an email and I will help you calculate how much fluid per body weight/ sweat rate.

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com. 

 

8.13.17/ What to Eat on Race Day:

Morning Race: 

If you have at least three to four hours before your morning race, you can have a relatively large meal of up to 700-800 calories, with a minimum of 400-500 calories.  This meal should be high in carbohydrate, moderate in protein, low in fat. Good examples of race-morning breakfasts are:

1 cup of oatmeal with nondairy milk, 1 banana, 1-2 tablespoons of almond or peanut butter.  You can also add extra nutrients: top with raw honey, bee pollen, shredded unsweetened coconut, and goji berries, and a glass of orange juice.

Or 2 pieces of toast or a small bagel with almond or peanut butter. and banana, and a glass of orange juice.

Or 1 cup of yogurt with granola and a piece of fruit.

Or a breakfast sandwich with 1 egg, avocado, and 2slices of bread with a glass of orange juice or a berry smoothie(make it a simple one, oj, berries banana) or even a beet orange carrot juice.

Or 2-3 pieces of waffles with jam, honey or agave and topped with fruits and 1spoon of yogurt. 

 

If you only have one or two hours to eat before the race, stick with foods that digest quickly and easily, and limit to 300-400 calories at the most, with a minimum of 150-250 calories. Good choices are:

Granola bar or sports bar (low in protein)

Handful of trail mix and/or dried fruit

Ounce or two of whole-grain crackers with a little peanut butter

1-2 plain pancakes.

If you're too nervous to eat solid food, nibble on snacks that are tolerable like pretzels, plain crackers apple sauce, etc...  Remember nutrition is not one size fits all, so you need to experiment what is best tolerable for you. 

 

Afternoon Race:

On race days or days of tough workouts, the best option is to pack your lunch with familiar foods that follow the guidelines for pre-workout meals. Good choices include:

Sandwich with lean meat and a piece of fruit

Plain rice and small piece of protein bowl with carrots and peas

Pasta bowl with light sauce(It could be a light meat sauce) starch veggies are ok carrots, potato, squashes

1-2 Peanut butter sandwich.

Be creative and don't fall victim to filling up on junk food or not eating at all. Also pay attention to the time gap between your lunch and your race. If it's longer than three hours, be sure to have a pre-race snack planned out that you can have one to two hours before.

Regardless of when your race is, eat foods that are familiar and avoid foods that are spicy, greasy, or especially high in fiber. Never experiment with new foods or food replacements (energy gels, sports bars, etc.) on race day. Use your pre-practice meals to figure out what foods will work best.

 

Best snacks:

Best snacks to have in your cross country bag are granola bars and/or sports bars, trail mix and dried fruit, pretzels, crackers(plain), dry granola, apple or pear sauce, peanut butter sandwiches, banana.

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.

 

7.30.17/ Smoothies:

Building your smoothie: 

1-Base: hard chunky ingredients like frozen fruits nuts and seeds go in first because they are close to the  blades.

2-Bulk: Soft chunky ingredients such as fresh fruits vegetables nut butters.

3-Powders and superfoods

4-Liquid

5-ice(optional )

 

Orange Goji Berries:

2 oranges, peeled, de-seeded, and chopped

1 frozen banana   

1⁄3 cup dried goji berries

2 tablespoons hemp seeds

1⁄2 cup coconut water

2 cups ice

Blend all the ingredients together, except for the ice, until smooth. Add the ice and blend once more until frosty. 

 

Banana Oats:

1⁄3 cup rolled oats (best if soaked overnight in almond milk)

1⁄2 cup dried white mulberries

2 frozen bananas

3 tablespoons hemp protein powder or any protein powder

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1⁄2 cups water

1 cup ice 

 

Berries Smoothie:

1 cup raspberries

1 frozen banana

1 cup Orange juice (more if needed or you can add coconut water)

1T chia seeds

1T cordyceps mushroom powder

1T super greens

2 brazil nuts

 

Tropical Smoothie:

2 cups spinach

1 cup mango

1 cup pineapple

1 cup frozen bananas

2 cups coconut water

1 tsp MCT oil

 

Peanut Butter Chocolate Smoothie:

1 cup almond milk or coconut milk

1 frozen banana

1 scoop chocolate protein powder (warrior blend)

1 ½ T unsweetened peanut butter

1 cup ice

Top with bee pollen 1tsp  and  1 tsp cacao nibs.

 

Chocolate Smoothie:

1⁄4 cup large Medjool dates, pitted (about 3–4 fruits)

2-3  tablespoon avocado, smashed

2 tablespoons cacao nibs

1⁄4 cup cacao powder

3 tablespoons hemp protein powder or vanilla protein powder

2 teaspoons maca powder

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 1⁄2 cups coconut water.  Or for more creamy, add almond or coconut milk.

 

Banana Berry Smoothie:

1 1⁄2 cups mixed frozen berries

2 frozen bananas

3 tablespoons dried white mulberries

3 tablespoons hemp seeds

2 tablespoons goji berries

1⁄2 teaspoon camu powder

1 teaspoon maqui berry powder

2 cups coconut milk 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

Chocolate Mint Smoothie:

1⁄3 cup hemp seeds

1⁄4 cup Medjool dates, pitted (about 3–4 large fruits)

3 tablespoons goji berries

1⁄4 cup cacao powder

2 tablespoons cacao nibs

3 tablespoons fresh mint

1 teaspoon green powder

1 cup spinach

1⁄4 cup mashed avocado

2 cups coconut water

3 cups coconut ice (freeze coconut water into ice cubes) optional

 

Superfoods

Acai powder: rich in minerals and amino acid also contain omega 3’s

Cacao powder: most mineral rich superfood, very high in antioxidants, double the amount of acai powder

Camu powder: Number one source of vitamin C. It’s the best combination with iron rich foods for better absorption. Immunity boosting, anti inflammatory, antiviral

Chlorella /Spirullina: very high in iron vitamin D, A and Bs

Mulberries: helps enhance cardiovascular health and promote circulation, excellent source of fiber

Maqui Berry Powder: very rich in vitamin C and antioxidants

Green Powder Superfood

Hemp seeds: one of the best sources of protein, contain all 8 essential amino acids, easy to digest, very rich in iron, magnesium and zinc

Chia seeds: contains 8 times more omega 3’s than salmon, 5 times more calcium than milk, 3 times more iron than spinach, and lots of protein

Maca powder: true energy food, balances adrenal glands (helps balance hormones), helps decrease anxiety and stress.

Bee pollen: increases energy levels, stamina, has antibiotic properties that help prevent colds, improve immune function, great for endurance

Goji berries: high in iron, vitamins and minerals

Cordyceps Mushroom Powder: Boost Immune system, boost energy levels, strength and stamina

 

Fats:

Avocado

Nut butter

Brazil nuts: 2-3 per day, no more.

 

7.23.17/ Fueling Strategies:

Pre-short run: drink 8oz-16oz of water one hour before run.

Eat 200 calorie of low fiber carb 30-60 min before run

 

Pre-Long Run: Drink 8-16oz of water with electrolytes  one hour before run

Eat 350-550 calories of low fiber low fat carbs 90-120 min before the run A bar(low in protein and fiber), bagel with jam, toast with peanut butter and honey, banana peanut butter or almond butter and a glass of OJ.

 

Post Short Run: Drink 8-24oz (or more in high temperatures) of water or electrolyte drink like NUUM(no sugar added) within 60 min.

Eat a small snack of 4:1 carbs to protein within 15 min, like energy bar(Quest bars) or protein shake.

 

Post Long Run: Drink 8-24oz of water(more in high temperatures) with electrolytes.

Eat a small snack 4:1 ratio same as short run (first window of recovery) and then within 2 hour after the run eat a full meal(second window of recovery)

 

Always remember that your diet and nutrition is as much a part of your training as getting in your mileage. It is very important that you are making sure you are giving your body the proper nutrients it needs to be able to recover and refuel in order to keep up the rest of your training.

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.

 

7.16.17/ Magnesium:

Your body needs magnesium for more than 300 biochemical reactions, and particular importance to runners is magnesium’s affect on muscle function. The mineral affects processes such as electrolyte balance, oxygen uptake and energy production, which are all involved in muscle function.

Magnesium is not produced by the body, so it needs to be ingested daily through the consumption of magnesium-rich foods 

Performance: Magnesium is vital for the conversion of glycogen to glucose, the body’s main fuel during exercise. Without sufficient levels the body switches to anaerobic metabolism, resulting in a buildup of lactic acid and associated muscle soreness and spasms. This means if you are low in magnesium you are likely to feel tired and lack energy.

Magnesium also influences protein metabolism, making it important for strength and power as well as recovery. Even  small shortfalls in magnesium intake can seriously impair athletic performance.

Bone Health: While calcium is important it does nothing without adequate levels of magnesium and vitamin D. Magnesium activates cellular enzyme activity, allowing the body to convert vitamin D into its active form to help with calcium absorption and bone building.

Recovery: Magnesium, together with calcium, is essential for optimal muscle function. A deficiency in magnesium can result in muscle and nerve twitches, spasms and cramping. Heavy exercisers often experience a buildup of lactic acid, shin splints and painful muscles during and after exercise. Having sufficient magnesium helps speed up recovery, reduce fatigue and avoid injuries.

Foods that contain magnesium:

Spinach

Pumpkin seeds 

Chard

Almonds

Black beans

Avocados

Yogurt 

 

Magnesium Rich Green Smoothie:

3 bananas (fresh or frozen)
1/2 bunch of fresh kale
1/2 bunch of fresh spinach
1 Tablespoon of Chlorella
4 dates
2 cups of fresh coconut water

Serves 2.

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.


7.09.17/ After Working Out

What to eat after a workout

First Window Recovery:

The best nutrients to consume during the 15-30 minute window immediately following prolonged exercise is a mix of carbohydrates and protein. You should aim to consume 100-300 calories.

The ratio of carbohydrates to protein should be 3:1 or 4:1 (carbohydrates:protein). This combination of carbohydrates to protein helps the body re-synthesize muscle glycogen more efficiently than carbohydrates alone. The consumption of too much protein in this process will inhibit your body’s absorption of the carbohydrates by slowing the gastric emptying rate. However, a little bit of protein helps produce muscle- building amino acids and hormones.

Proper nutrition during the first 15-30 minute window immediately following exercise is your first step to having a better run tomorrow.

 

Whole foods/Sports Supplements (on the go ideas):

1 Banana + 2 Tablespoons Peanut Butter

1/2 cup plain yogurt + 1 cup Mixed Fruit

1 medium Sweet potato (great source of potassium) + 1 inch Beef Jerky

1 medium apple + 2 Tablespoons Peanut Butter

1 hard boiled egg+ 1 cup sauteed spinach + 1 serving fruit

Sport Supplements:

Vega Protein and Greens

Sun Warrior (Warrior Blend Chocolate or Vanilla)

Energy/Nutrition Bars (You have to really read labels, not all bars are created equal)  Quest bars, RX bars.


Second Window Recovery:

The second window for optimal recovery is from one hour to three hours post workout. In this window of recovery, a meal or snack that is higher in protein but also includes a healthy fat and carbohydrate is best.

Like the first, immediate window of recovery, the second window does not need to be a high calorie meal or snack. This can consist of 150 calories and up. The goal with eating in these two windows is not to consume more calories than you actually need; rather, the objective is to help give your body the right combination of nutrients at the right time, decrease inflammation, increase muscle glycogen stores, and rebuild damaged muscle tissue.

Foods to eat:

Protein Shake + Salad w/olive oil dressing

Protein Bar (Read labels)

Protein Based Meals/snacks:

Grilled Chicken + Salad topped with Avocado and Salsa

Steak Salad

Vegetable omelet + Fruit

Chili (An amazingly well balanced meal)

Collagen Protein shake (BulletProof collagen Protein (amazing source of iron)

Burrito (High in iron) and a glass of   Orange juice (for best iron absorption)RECIPE.

Recovering  from these hard efforts (workouts) is very important. Running on muscles that are still torn and fatigued, with little to no glycogen stores, is a recipe for injury and over-training. Supplying your body with the correct nutrients at the correct times will set you up for success as your train for your next event.

Start nourishing your body within the two windows I have suggested and watch as your runs feel better and your race times get faster!


Make Ahead Breakfast Burritos:

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 bag (6 ounces) baby spinach (about 4 packed cups)

10 eggs, beaten

½ teaspoon fine sea salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

6 burrito-size  tortillas (about 10 inches)

1½ cups grated favorite cheese

1½ cups Homemade beans  or 1 can (15 ounces) lack or pinto beans

Optional ( beef cut small, turkey bacon, potato or sweet potato roasted)

1.Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet (eggs are the one dish we cook in a nonstick pan) over medium heat. Add the spinach and cook until just wilted. Add the eggs, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring continuously, until scrambled. Remove from the heat.

2.Place each tortilla on a 12 x 12-inch sheet of aluminum foil and sprinkle with ¼ cup of the cheese. Divide the egg-spinach mixture among the 6 tortillas, placing in a strip down the center of the wrap. Top each with ¼ cup of the beans.

3.Roll up each tortilla like a burrito by folding in the tops and bottoms, and wrap tightly in the foil. Place together in a gallon-size freezer bag and freeze for up to 2 months.

4.To reheat, unwrap from the foil, place on a microwaveable plate, and microwave on high for 2 to 3 minutes, rotating after 1 minute, until warm in the center.

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.

 


7.02.17/ Before Working Out

Before a Workout:

You should generally try to eat one to three hours before a work out to give yourself proper fueling. If you are not energized properly, you will not perform your best. 

Your pre-exercise snacks should be carbohydrate-rich to top off muscle glycogen stores, include a small amount of protein to reduce post-exercise muscle soreness, and be low in fat and fiber to ensure optimal digestion.

One hour workouts:

If you workout for an hour at an easy effort a small snack 30 min before can help you feel energized and strong throughout the workout, if the workout is more intense you should try to get something in your stomach 30-90 min before.

1 banana with nut butter

1 rice cakes with nut butter

1 slice of bread with nut butter and raw honey

Pretzels and hummus

Waffle and honey

Crackers

Applesauce

Dates or raisins 

60-90 min workouts:

If you are going for 60-90 min workouts you need to plan ahead (an hour) to digest properly, and you should aim for a mix of complex and simple carbs with a touch of protein to keep you satisfied longer. 

Oatmeal: small amount with mashed banana and a drizzle of honey

1 pancake  with honey or nut butter

Granola and almond milk 

Muffin(recipe below)

Bars

These are just some samples ideas.  While eating before run is highly individualized, with a few simple experiments, you can find the optimal pre-run meal or snack. 

In general the harder you have to run the further back your snack should be. 

 

Superhero Muffins:

2 cups almond meal

1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats (gluten-free if sensitive)

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon fine sea salt

½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

½ cup raisins, chopped dates, or chocolate chips (optional)

3 eggs, beaten

1 cup grated zucchini (about 1 zucchini)

1 cup grated carrots (about 2 carrots)

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

½ cup dark amber maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

1.Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Line a 12-cup standard muffin tin with paper muffin cups.

2.In a large bowl, combine the almond meal, oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, baking soda, salt, and walnuts, raisins, dates, or chocolate chips (if using).

3.In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, zucchini, carrots, butter, maple syrup, and vanilla. Add to the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. The batter will be thick.

4.Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling each to the brim. Bake until the muffins are nicely browned on top and a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean, 25 to 35 minutes

 

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.

 

 

6.25.17/ Breakfast

Eating breakfast replenishes your body's glycogen, which is lower in the morning due to the energy used for sleeping. Eating breakfast each morning is crucial to top performance throughout the day.

Skipping breakfast can leave you feeling tired and unable to concentrate; it also leads to overeating at later meals and snacks. Student athletes who eat breakfast perform better in the classroom/practice than those who skip breakfast.

Early morning practices pose a challenge because you don't want to wake up 45 minutes early to eat. Try eating a snack right before you go to bed, and a simple before practice "breakfast" like a banana or a toast with almond butter. For the days when practice is in the afternoon, eat a good nutrient dense meal for breakfast, like a shake, toast with one egg and 1/2 avocado (for extra nutrients you can add 1T hemp seeds or pumpkin seeds), smoothie bowl, overnight oats, regular oatmeal. Try to add a portion of protein, carbs and fat. 

Overnight Oats Recipe:

Basic: 1/2 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup (almond milk, coconut milk,milk)

1T chia seeds

Extras:
Add vanilla extract 1tsp

1 T almond or peanut butter

Banana slices
Berries
Cocoa or Cacau
Toasted coconut

For sweetener, you can add raw honey or raw agave. 

Mix the basic 3 ingredients, store in the fridge overnight, add the rest and toppings in the am.  You can also warm it up in the am if you prefer hot. 

Fernanda Aguiar, Registered Dietician, fe71@mac.com.

 

6.18.17/ Are You Iron Deficient?

You need iron in your blood to get oxygen to your muscles. If you have the symptoms of iron deficiency listed below, you should get yourself tested having both your haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels checked out.

One thing to remember is that iron deficiency doesn't just happen overnight. It starts slowly and is exacerbated by poor nutritional consumption. This then forces the body to tap into its reserves. Over time, these reserves become depleted causing the body to manufacture red blood cells that are smaller and carry less than normal levels of haemoglobin.

I recommend having a base test of iron levels before  summer so we can get a base number, than another blood work before school starts and monitoring during season if you are prone to iron deficiency. You can go to your doctor and get that done or you can contact me RDN for more information. Don’t wait until you have the problem to get the test (BOYS AND GIRLS).

This might not seem like a big deal but as the average lifespan of a red blood cell is 120 days, over time the smaller and more inferior red blood cells start to out-number the good ones. This severely impairs the body's ability to carry oxygen around the body, resulting in your heart needing to beat faster to ensure oxygen delivery.

Symptoms include:

  • Elevated heart rate
  • Poor/reduced performance
  • Easily exhausted
  • Less enthusiasm for running and feeling very tired
  • Irritability
  • Feeling the cold – especially hands and feet
  • A poor appetite
  • Pale skin
  • Shortness of breath
  • Headache
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Inflammation or soreness of your tongue
  • Brittle nails
  • Unusual cravings
  • Restless legs syndrome

 Why Athletes Are at Risk

There are a few reasons why athletes are at a higher risk of experiencing iron deficiency compared to their non-athletic counterparts:

 Higher requirements for iron use:

  • Red blood cell mass increases, meaning athletes have higher iron needs. 
  • Iron needs are higher during times of growth.
     

Increased risk of iron loss:

  • Iron is lost in sweat. Athletes with high sweat loss have higher iron loss.
  • Iron can be lost through gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal bleeding is common during strenuous exercise due to minor damage to the stomach and intestinal lining.
  • Habitual use of anti-inflammatory drugs leads to iron loss.
  • Foot strike hemolysis, which is caused by repeated pounding of the feet on hard surfaces, can destroy red blood cells, allowing for iron to be lost.
     

The Difference Between Anemia and Sports Anemia

A person’s iron status can be difficult to assess from a single blood test, as strenuous exercise can increase the volume of plasma in the blood, diluting the levels of hemoglobin. This increase can sometimes incorrectly suggest there is a deficiency. This is called sports anemia. This condition does not need any treatment as it is generally found in people who are only in the early stages of a training program.

Iron maiden food

  • The best sources of HAEM iron (which is the most absorbable iron) include liver, beef, but also poultry (especially the darker wing meat). Eggs are also a worthwhile source.
  • All round health-booster oily fish is also great, for example sardines contain 5.8mg in one small tin.

Combine the above with...

  • Green leafy vegetables (watercress, broccoli, spinach and curly kale – sources of calcium too)
  • Bread and cereals fortified with iron
  • Beans and chickpeas
  • Nuts such as almonds
  • Seeds such as sunflower and pumpkin
  • Dried fruit such as figs, apricots, prunes, raisins

You can also try...

  • Hemp sprinkled on soups
  • Spirulina which has 58 times more iron than spinach

To help the body absorb iron...

Take Vitamin C to absorb the iron, try orange juice with your cereal, peppers in your salad, strawberries for dessert.
And avoid drinking tea with your meals. It contains polyphenols that can inhibit iron absorption.

 

 Treating the Deficiency

In order to recover the depleted stores of iron in your body some form of supplementation will be needed along with a diet rich in iron containing foods. Supplementation generally involves 50mg or more of iron per day in conjunction with vitamin C to enhance absorption. This is because changing diet alone will take too long to correct the problem. Recovering your iron stores is a slow process and can take up to three months.

 

A medical professional should always be consulted before you supplement your iron, as regular use of un-needed iron supplements can interfere with zinc and copper absorption and may have negative effects on the immune system. In a portion of the population, a genetic disorder called hemochromatosis allows excess iron to be absorbed. This iron overload disorder affects around 1 in 300 Caucasians. In this condition, too much iron in the cells and tissues can cause irreversible damage along with a high risk of cancer and heart disease. Always ask your doctor or a dietitian (me) to check your iron status first before you take iron supplements. As a side note it is impossible for a healthy, normal person to absorb too much iron from their diet.

 

Supplements

  • Floradix Liquid Iron Formula – also contains vitamins, especially cultured yeast and ocean kelp
  • Blood Builder 

Fernanda Aguiar RDN


 

6.11.17/ Sports Nutrition:

Sports nutrition for young athletes is critical for their success. All athletes strive to compete at the top of their game but, unbeknownst to many of them, their performance relies on their optimum nutritional balance. The concern is that many young athletes require greater amounts of nutrients but remain uninformed or unconcerned about their nutrition needs or simply feel powerless to improve their nutritional status.

The food you eat supplies much more than just fuel for your body to function properly.  It provides the raw materials from which your skin, hair, muscle, bone, and all other tissues are made.  Your diet provides nutrients that are necessary to manufacture hormones and enzymes that control the function of every cell in your body.  Your body also uses these nutrients to make neurotransmitters that regulate how you think and feel.  Therefore, ensuring a proper balance of nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals) is essential to your overall health, muscle development and performance.  You really are what you eat, and that’s why a balanced diet is SO important.

Eating three meals daily (starting with a hearty breakfast, as breakfast sets your metabolism for the day), and 2-3 snacks daily is the best way to keep you properly energized and satisfied.  Eating or not eating affects hormone levels that can cause muscle loss as well, so it is extremely important NOT to skip meals.  Healthy snacking, especially before practices or games, is also important.  This will provide the energy you need for optimal performance, and more importantly will help guard against injuries and help with recovery time.  You should develop good, consistent eating habits, even during the off-season, as this will provide a solid foundation during times of competition.  Remember, the best fueled athlete is the better athlete…

The quality and quantity of the food you consume is important.  The metabolic requirements for active teens can be as high as 3,500 calories a day, for example, which means your body requires this amount of calories to function properly.  Also, the less processed the food, the more nutritious it is.

Cross Country Smoothie Breakfast Recipe:

1 cup orange juice (you can add more if it is thick)

1 frozen banana

1 cup frozen berries

1 cup spinach or  1 T supergreens( Sunfood Brand is a good one)

1 tsp. Mushroom powder (cordyceps)(I use OM brand)

2 Brazil nuts (very rich in selenium and boost hormones naturaly)

2 tsp chia seeds

blend top with bee pollen for extra nutrition. (you can sub the orange juice for almond milk or coconut milk unsweetened but for athletes that are struggling with iron, orange juice is better for iron absorption)

Fernanda Aguiar:
Introducing Fernanda Aguiar, AKA Izzy's mom:  She is a Registered Dietician, Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, and Wellness Coach.  Because she races year round as a Silver All World Athlete in the sport of triathlon (IM 70.3 and 140.6), she knows what she is talking about!  Plus, she is an ACE certified Personal Trainer, Nike SPARQ Speed and Agility coach, HKC Kettlebell Certified and Primal Move coach.
Maintaining a strong and healthy athletic performance is more than just a matter of training and keeping in shape.  Your body needs support in the form of proper nutrition, hydration and rest to allow you to keep performing and responding at peak levels.
She will be writing a tip each week.  If you have any questions for her, you may contact her at fe71@mac.com.  (No charge for team athletes).